King Charles to honour promise and ‘recognise all faiths’

King Charles III reportedly plans to recognize “all faiths” as he is crowned next year, with his Coronation to honor an old promise. Buckingham Palace confirmed last year that he would have his Coronation in May 2023. Recent reports suggest he will recommit to a previous pledge to serve as “defender of all faiths”.

The Daily Telegraph has said aides and officials are planning to add words to the monarch’s official pledge as he participates in the ceremony next year.

The traditional Coronation oath sees the Monarch promise to serve as “Defender of the Faith”, referring to the Church of England.

While that part of the oath will remain unchanged, the addition from aides will reportedly allow him to recognize a previous commitment to the UK’s multi-faith landscape.

The specific wording of the addition remains under discussion.

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Speaking to Faith leaders in December, he said British society could only thrive through promises to uphold several “vital principles”.

He said: “The beliefs that flourish in, and contribute to, our richly diverse society differ.

“They, and our society, can only thrive through a clear collective commitment to those vital principles of freedom of conscience, generosity of spirit and care for others which are, to me, the essence of our nationhood.

“I am determined, as King, to preserve and promote those principles across all communities, and for all beliefs, with all my heart.”

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The percentage of other faiths has increased since then, with 1.2 million more Britons identifying as Muslim.

The proportion of Sikhs grew by 0.1 percent from 0.8 percent to 0.9 percent (423,000 to 524,000), the UK’s Hindu population grew from 1.5 percent to 1.7 percent (818,000 to one million), and the number of Jewish Britons increased from 265,000 to 271,000.

The population of people identifying with a faith other than Buddhist, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim or Sikh grew by more than 100,000.

The number of Britons identifying as “no religion” increased from 25.1 percent (14.1 million) to 37.2 (22.2 million).



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